Category: Development

JVx Reference, of Technologies and Factories

Post to Twitter

Let's talk about the UI layer, the implementations and the factory that powers it all.

The basics

For everyone who does not know, JVx allows you to write code once and run it on different GUI frameworks, without changing your code. This is achieved by hiding the concrete GUI implementations behind our own classes, the UI classes, and providing "bindings" for different GUI frameworks behind the scenes. Such a "Single Sourcing" approach has many advantages, and just one of them is that migrating to a new GUI framework requires only the change of a single line, the one which controls which factory is created.

The Factory Pattern

The Factory Pattern is an important pattern in Object-Oriented-Programming, it empowers us to delegate the creation of Objects to another Object which must not be known at design and/or compile time. That allows us to use Objects which have not been created by us but merely "provided" to us by an, for us unknown, implementation.

Like an onion

JVx is separated into different layers, with the UI layer being at the top and of the most concern to users.

JVx Layers

Technology

Obviously, the first one in the chain is the so called "technology" layer. It represents the UI technology, for example Swing, JavaFX or Vaadin, which is used to power the JVx application.

To put it into a more simple term:

public class JButton {}

Extension

Next comes the extension layer, components from the technology are extended to support needed features of JVx. This includes creating bindings for the databook, additional style options and changing of behavior if necessary. From time to time this also includes creating components from scratch if the provided ones do not meet the needs or there simply are none with the required functionality. For the most part, we do our best that these layers can be used without JVx, meaning that they represent a solitary extension to the technology. A very good example is our JavaFX implementation, which compiles into two separate jars, the first being the complete JVx/JavaFX stack, the second being stand-alone JavaFX extensions which can be used in any application and without JVx.

Theoretically one can skip this layer and directly jump to the Implementation layer, but so far it has proven necessary (for cleanliness of the code and object structure and sanity reasons) to create a separate extension layer.

public class JExtendedButton extends JButton {}

Implementation

After that comes the implementation layer. The extended components are extended to implement JVx interfaces. This is some sort of "glue" layer, it binds the technology or extended components against the interfaces which are provided by JVx.

public class SwingButton<JExtendedButton> implements IButton {}

UI

Last but for sure not least is the UI layer, which wraps the implementations. It is completely Implementation independent, that means that one can swap out the stack underneath:

JVx Layers

This is achieved because the UI layer is not extending the Implementation layer, but wrapping instances provided by the factory. It is oblivious to what Technology is actually underneath it.

public class UIButton<IButton> implements IButton {}

SwingButton resource = SwingFactory.createButton()

Why is the UI layer necessary?

It isn't, not at all. The Implementations could be used directly without any problems, but having yet another layer has two key benefits:

  1. It allows easier usage.
  2. It allows to add Technology independent features.

By wrapping it one more time we gain a lot of freedom which we would not have otherwise, when it comes to features as when it comes to coding. The user does not need to call the factory directly and instead just needs to create a new object:

IButton button = new UIButton();

Internally, of course, the Factory is called and an implementation instance is created, but that is an implementation detail. If we would use the implementation layer directly, our code would either need to know about the implementations, which doesn't follow the Single-Sourcing principle:

IButton button = new SwingButton();

It also would be possible to directly use the factory (but this isn't modern coding style):

IButton button = UIFactoryManager.getFactory().createButton();

Both can be avoided by using another layer which does the factory calls for us:

public class UIButton implements IButton
{
    private IButton resource;

    public UIButton()
    {
        resource = UIFactoryManager.getFactory().createButton();
    }

    public void someInterfaceMethod()
    {
        resource.someInterfaceMethod();
    }
}

Additionally this layer allows us to implement features which can be technology independent, our naming scheme, which we created during stress testing of an Vaadin application, is a very good example of that. The names of the components are derived in the UI layer without any knowledge of the underlying Technology or Implementation.

Also it does provide us (and everyone else of course) with a layer which allows to rapidly and easily build compound components out of already existing ones, like this:

public class LabeledButton extends UIPanel
{
    private IButton button = null;
    private ILabel label = null;
   
    public LabeledButton ()
    {
        super();

        initializeUI();
    }

    private void initializeUI()
    {
        button = new UIButton();
        label = new UILabel();
       
        setLayout(new UIBorderLayout());
        add(label, UIBorderLayout.LEFT);
        add(button, UIBorderLayout.CENTER);
    }
}

Of course that is not even close to sophisticated, or a good example for that matter. But it shows that one can build new components out of already existing ones without having to deal with the Technology or Implementation at all, creating truly cross-technology controls.

The Factory

The heart piece of the UI layer is the Factory, which is creating the Implemented classes. It's a rather simple system, a Singleton which is set at the beginning to the Technology specific factory which can be retrieved later:

// At the start of the application.
UIFactoryManager.setFactoryInstance(new SwingFactory());
// Or alternately:
UIFactory.getFactoryInstance(SwingFactory.class());

// Later inside the UI wrappers.
IButton button = UIFactory.getFactory().createButton();

The complexity of the implementation of the factory is technology dependent, but for the most part it is devoid of any logic:

public class SwingFactory implements IFactory
{
    @Override
    public IButton createButton()
    {
        SwingButton button = new SwingButton();
        button.setFactory(this);

        return button;
    }
}

It "just returns new objects" from the implementation layer. That's about it when it comes to the factory, it is as simple as that.

Piecing it together

With all this in mind, we know now that JVx has swappable implementations underneath its UI layer for each technology it utilizes:

JVx Layers

Changing between them can be as easy as setting a different factory. I say "can", because that is only true for Swing, JavaFX and similar technologies, Vaadin, obviously, requires some more setup work. I mean, theoretically one could embed a complete application server and launch it when the factory for Vaadin is created, allowing the application to be basically stand-alone and be started as easily as a Swing application. That is possible.

What else?

That is how JVx works in regards to the UI layer. It depends on "technology specific stacks" which can be swapped out and implemented for pretty much every GUI framework out there. We currently provide support for Swing, JavaFX and Vaadin, but we also had implementations for GWT and Qt. Additionally we do support a "headless" implementation which allows to use lightweight objects which might be serialized and send over the wire without much effort.

Adding a new Technology

Adding support for a new Technology is as straightforward as one can imagine, simply creating the Extensions/Implementations layers and implementing the factory for that Technology. Giving a complete manual would be out for scope for this post, but the most simple approach to adding a new stack to JVx is to start with stubbing out the IFactory and implementing IWindow. Once that one window shows up, it's just implementing one interface after another in a quite straightforward manner. And in the end, your application can switch to yet another GUI framework without the need to change your code.

JVx Reference, Events

Post to Twitter

Let's talk about events and event handling in JVx.

What are events...

Events are an important mechanism no matter to what programming language or framework you turn to. It allows us to react on certain actions and "defer" actions until something triggered them. Such triggers can be anything, like a certain condition is hit in another thread, the user clicked a button or another action has finally finished. Long story short, you get notified that something happened, and that you can now do something.

...and why do I need to handle them?

Well, you can't skip events, they are a cornerstone of JVx. Theoretically, you could use JVx without using any of its events, but you would not only miss out on a lot of functionality but also be unable to do anything useful. But don't worry, understanding the event system is easy, using it even easier.

Terminology

For JVx the following terminology applies: An event is a property of an object, you can register listeners on that event which will get invoked if the event is dispatched (fired). Every event consists of the EventHandler class which allows to register, remove and manage the listeners and also dispatches the events, meaning invoking the listeners and notifying them that the event occurred. There is no single underlying listener interface.

Within the JVx framework, every event-property of an object does start with the prefix "event" to make it easily searchable and identifiable. But enough dry talk, let's get started.

Attaching listeners as class

The easiest way to get notified of events is to attach a class (which is implementing the listener interface) to an event as listener, like this:

public class MainFrame extends UIFrame
{
    public MainFrame()
    {
        super();
       
        UIButton button = new UIButton("Click me!");
        button.eventAction().addListener(new ActionListener());
       
        setLayout(new UIBorderLayout());
        add(button, UIBorderLayout.CENTER);
    }
}

private static final class ActionListener implements IActionListener
{
    public void action(UIActionEvent pActionEvent) throws Throwable
    {
        System.out.println("Button clicked!");
    }
}

Attaching listeners as inlined class

Of course we can inline this listener class:

public class MainFrame extends UIFrame
{
    public MainFrame()
    {
        super();
       
        UIButton button = new UIButton("Click me!");
        button.eventAction().addListener(new IActionListener()
        {
            public void action(UIActionEvent pActionEvent) throws Throwable
            {
                System.out.println("Button clicked!");
            }
        });
       
        setLayout(new UIBorderLayout());
        add(button, UIBorderLayout.CENTER);
    }
}

Attaching listeners JVx style

So far, so normal. But in JVx we have support to attach listeners based on reflection, like this:

public class MainFrame extends UIFrame
{
    public MainFrame()
    {
        super();
       
        UIButton button = new UIButton("Click me!");
        button.eventAction().addListener(this, "doButtonClick");
       
        setLayout(new UIBorderLayout());
        add(button, UIBorderLayout.CENTER);
    }
   
    public void doButtonClick(UIActionEvent pActionEvent) throws Throwable
    {
        System.out.println("Button clicked");
    }
}

What is happening here is that, internally, a listener is created which references the given object and the named method. This allows to easily add and remove listeners from events and keeping the classes clean by allowing to have all related event listeners in one place and without additional class definitions.

Attaching listeners as lambdas

Yet there is more, we can of course attach lambdas to the events as listeners, too:

public class MainFrame extends UIFrame
{
    public MainFrame()
    {
        super();
       
        UIButton button = new UIButton("Click me!");
        button.eventAction().addListener((pActionEvent) -> System.out.println("Button clicked"));
       
        setLayout(new UIBorderLayout());
        add(button, UIBorderLayout.CENTER);
    }
}

Attaching listeners as method references

And last but not least, thanks to the new capabilities of Java 1.8, we can also use method references:

public class MainFrame extends UIFrame
{
    public MainFrame()
    {
        super();
       
        UIButton button = new UIButton("Click me!");
        button.eventAction().addListener(this::doButtonClick);
       
        setLayout(new UIBorderLayout());
        add(button, UIBorderLayout.CENTER);
    }
   
    private void doButtonClick(UIActionEvent pActionEvent) throws Throwable
    {
        System.out.println("Button clicked");
    }
}

Parameters or no parameters? To throw or not to throw?

By default we actually support two different classes of listeners, the specified event/listener interface itself, and (javax.rad.util.)IRunnable. Which means that you can also attach methods which do not have any parameters, like this:

public class MainFrame extends UIFrame
{
    public MainFrame()
    {
        super();
       
        UIButton button = new UIButton("Click me!");
        button.eventAction().addListener(this::doButtonClickNoParameters);
        button.eventAction().addListener(this::doButtonClickWithParameters);
       
        setLayout(new UIBorderLayout());
        add(button, UIBorderLayout.CENTER);
    }
   
    private void doButtonClickNoParameters() throws Throwable
    {
        System.out.println("Button clicked");
    }

    private void doButtonClickWithParameters(UIActionEvent pActionEvent) throws Throwable
    {
        System.out.println("Button clicked");
    }
}

Additionally, all listeners and IRunnable itself do support to throw Throwable, which is then handled inside the EventHandler. So you are very flexible when it comes to what methods you can attach and use as listeners.

Creating your own events

You can, of course, create your own EventHandlers and listeners to create your own events. All you need are two classes, an extension of EventHandler and a listener interface.

public class CustomEvent extends EventHandler
{
    public CustomEvent()
    {
        super(ICustomListener.class);
    }
}

public interface ICustomListener
{
    public void somethingHappened(String pName);
}

And that's it, from here on you can use it:

CustomEvent event = new CustomEvent();
event.addListener((pName) -> System.out.println(pName + " 1"));
event.addListener((pName) -> System.out.println(pName + " 2"));
event.addListener((pName) -> System.out.println(pName + " 3"));

event.dispatchEvent("Adam");

More methods!

You can also use an interface for listeners which has multiple methods, specifying in the constructor which method to invoke:

public class CustomEvent extends EventHandler
{
    public CustomEvent()
    {
        super(ICustomListener.class, "somethingOtherHappened");
    }
}

public interface ICustomListener
{
    public void somethingHappened(String pName);
    public void somethingOtherHappened(String pName, BigDecimal pValue);
    public void nothingHappened();
}

Now every time the event is dispatched, the somethingOtherHappened method will be invoked. Anyway, don't use this. The upside of having a "simple" listener interface with just one method (SAM-type) is that it allows to use lambdas with it. A listener interface with multiple methods won't allow this.

In JVx we reduced our listener interfaces to just one method (in a backward compatible way) to make sure all events can be used with lambdas.

Fire away!

That's it for this short reference sheet, that is how our event system can and should be used. Of course, there is much more to it under the hood, for example listeners being wrapped in proxy classes, reflection used for invoking methods and some more stuff. If you feel adventurous, be my guest and have a good look at the internals of EventHandler, it is quite an interesting read.

EPlug 1.2.5

Post to Twitter

We're happy to announce the release of EPlug 1.2.5. Even though the change in the version number is quite small, the changes which have gone into this version are very interesting.

Better hover information and improved DataBookView

The biggest visual change in this new version is the new hover information for columns:

New hover information

New hover information

As you can see it has been vastly extended, with nearly all information about the column which you might want to know about, including its type, the label and all other properties.

Also the image preview is now more useful and is displaying the complete image but scaled to fit the hover:

New hover information

Additionally the DataBookView has been restructured to display the information in a more easily digestible way, structured by variable name and source of the columns:

Improved DataBookView

Improved DataBook support

The support for DataBooks/DataRows has been greatly improved and the plugin does now support a lot more variations on how to achieve the metadata. For example cloning of ColumnDefinitions, assigning of RowDefinitions and even getDataRow(...) and similar methods are now processed to acquire the metadata and column information.

Objects in server calls

One of the build-time checks is the type-check of parameters in server calls. Let's look at a simple example:

// Server side
public void serverSideAction(ActionType pActionType, String pLogMessage, BigDecimal pId);

// Client side
getConnection().callAction(
    "serverSideAction",
    ActionType.DO_IT_LATER,
    "Some message which will be logged",
    dataBook.getValue("ID"));

While this compiles completely fine in pure Java (because callAction(...) does accept an Object vararg), EPlug would flag it with an error because getValue(...) returns an Object but the server-side expects a BigDecimal. With this update there is now a build option available in the Project/EPlug settings to ignore such errors, allowing to pass Objects to the server side without checks.

Misspelled a column name? No problem!

We do now offer QuickFixes for column names with typos:

Column name QuickFixes

Automatic check of complement files

There is now a new build option in the Project/EPlug settings which allows to enable the automatic check of complement files. A "complement" file is simply the "other side", for example for the lifecycle-object the complement file is the workscreen, and vice versa. That means that now workscreens are automatically checked if the lifecycle object changes.

Preliminary String array support

There are various functions which do accept a String array of column names, for example getValues(...). Because of limitations coming up from the JDT infrastructure which we are using, we've been unable to provide autocompletion for column names in such circumstances:

dataBook.getValues(new String[] { "|

We are still unable to determine the exact databook in such circumstances, but we do now simply provide all columns as completion suggestions. What we can do is provide full hover and build support for these functions.

Improved VisionX/EPlug communication

VisionX is now a lot more talkative, it informs EPlug about file changes. If "Auto Reload" is enabled in EPlug, all files that have been changed by VisionX will now be reloaded and checked automatically. The same accounts for changed metadata.

Changes

  • Updated JVx version
  • Cached MetaData is now correctly invalidated and refreshed
  • DataBookView is now not constantly refreshed
  • Markers (Errors, Warnings) are now only placed on the names of the columns, instead of the whole statement
  • Inserted methods (from quick fixes) should now always be correctly formed
  • Fixed "phantom" markers which could pop up during build
  • Fixed that the DataBookView might not display all metadata
  • Fixed that folding nodes in the DataBookView made the child-nodes vanish
  • Various bug fixes

Simply update EPlug via Eclipse!

JVx 2.5.1 is available

Post to Twitter

We're happy to announce that JVx 2.5.1 is available.

What's new?

  • Push-light

    Our push support has nothing to do with Websockets. It's a technology independent solution for JVx. The Push-light mechanism is available on server-side and enables you to send objects from the server to the client. If you use a direct connection betwenn client and server, the objects wil be sent immediate (e.g. vaadin UI). If you use a serialized connection, the objects will be sent with next client call or alive check.

    The API is simple:

    SessionContext.publishCallBackResult("MESSAGE", "Please logout!");

    or, in a Thread

    final ICallBackBroker broker = SessionContext.getCurrentInstance().getCallBackBroker();

    Thread th = new Thread(new Runnable()
    {
        public void run()
        {
            try
            {
                int i = 0;

                while (isMessageLoopEnabled(i))
                {
                    Thread.sleep(200);
                   
                    broker.publish("MESSAGE", getMessage(i++));
                }
            }
            catch (InterruptedException ie)
            {
                //done
            }
        }
    });
    th.start();

    It's also possible to publish to all clients, via ICallBackBroker.

    The client code is short and simple:

    connection.addCallBackResultListener(new ICallBackResultListener()
    {
        public void callBackResult(CallBackResultEvent pEvent)
        {
            if ("MESSAGE".equals(pEvent.getInstruction()))
            {
                showMessage((String)pEvent.getObject());
            }
        }
    });

    More details: Tickets #25, #1635

  • H2 DB support

    We support H2 with a custom H2DBAccess. The auto detection works with URLs: jdbc:h2:.

  • SQLite DB support

    We support SQLite with a custom SQLiteDBAccess. The auto detection works with URLs: jdbc:sqlite:.

  • MySql limit support

    Read more...

  • Life-cylcle object method inheritance
  • Pie control
  • Set individual cells of a table readonly
  • Connection retries

    We try to re-send requests, if errors occur during transmission. This feature will be available for serialized connections only.

  • Security improvements

    see Tickets: #1605, #1606, #630.

  • Session validator

    We introduced ISessionValidator interface. It allows you to cancel the session after successful authentication. You don't need a custom security manager for this!
    Simply configure the validator in your config.xml:

    <lifecycle>
      <mastersession postAuthClass="com.sibvisions.apps.server.MySessionValidator">
    com.sibvisions.apps.demo.MySession
      </mastersession>
    </lifecycle>
  • API changes

    ICellFormat got a Style attribute and the createCellFormat of IFactory got one more parameter.

The full changelog is available here.

Eclipse NEON with ANT and JRE6

Post to Twitter

This is a follow-up post for: Eclipse MARS with ANT and JRE 6 (story).

New Eclipse version, same problem. We have an updated ant plugin for you.
The plugin was created for:

Version: Neon Release (4.6.0)
Build id: 20160613-1800

Don't forget the -clean start (read the original article for more details).

Download the plugin from here. It works for us - no warranty!

JVx and MySQL, Limited Edition

Post to Twitter

If you work with JDBC and MySQL, you will most likely be aware of one shortcoming: MySQL can not stream the results from a query (well, actually it can, but the feature is quite limited). That means that up until now JVx has always received and stored the full result set in memory which it received from MySQL. No paging was performed as it was done in the Oracle implementation.

Limit to the rescue!

MySQL does support the limit clause, which allows to limit the results to either a certain number of rows, or a certain range of rows. How does it look like?

SELECT
    ID,
    NAME
FROM
    TEST
WHERE
    NAME LIKE 'Hans%'
LIMIT 5, 10;

This will fetch the data starting by the 5th row up to the 15th row, so it will skip the first five rows and then return the next ten. As this is a database builtin, no additional data is send over the wire except the actual requested rows. This is perfect if you want to limit your queries, for example, because you know that you don't need more than 5 rows even though there are 50,000 rows.

Fetch all the things!

With the old behavior, without limit clause, the JDBC MySQL driver would fetch the complete result of the query and only we would do some cutting on it (mainly dropping not needed rows at the start). That meant that the complete result set was always loaded into memory, which itself might have caused that you were unable to execute certain queries, especially if they contained bigger blob columns.

Limit all the things!

With the new behavior, the limit clause is appended to the query as needed, which means that the JDBC MySQL driver has to load a lot less data and a lot less data is send over the wire.

The MySQL giveth, the MySQL taketh away...

But there is an additional cost associated with the usage of the limit clause. Because the fetches are separate statements, all rows leading up to the beginning row have to be selected, too. Let us return to our first example, the query of the TEST table. We only want 10 rows starting from the 5th row, that means our result set only contains 10 rows. However, MySQL has (obviously) to query, select and discard the first five rows so that it can start sending us the rows that we actually want. That means that the cost of selecting pages increases. Off to pretty graphics!

Impressions

Note that the fetch time is accumulative.

  • Blue: The original implementation which does perform only one fetch of all data. In this case it is quite fast, but depending on the query and data you could wait a long time for the initial fetch, if it was possible at all.
  • Orange: The current implementation with quite a worst case scenario, it gradually fetches page after page with a row count of 50. As you can see the fetch time gradually increases, but as you can also see the initial fetches are fast.
  • Yellow: An optimization experiment which increases the fetched row count dynamically.

Let us look at this again in detail, to be exact the fetching of the first 1500 rows.

Impressions

What we see here is quite good news, actually, because with the new implementation with the limit clause, you can consecutively fetch 600 rows in the same time as the fetching of the 4400 rows with the old implementation. The big difference here is that the first set of ~113 rows returns close to immediately and consecutive fetches are equally fast. This is awesome because we can now display initial data faster, even few it is fewer data in the end and slows down the more data is fetched afterwards.

Improve all the things!

As you can see from the charts, we already did a short experiment to improve this further, and we are confident that we can implement such a solution which dynamically fetches more rows to reduce the overall fetch time while still preserving that the first rows are displayed fast, further improving GUI responsiveness.

VisionX 2.3 Update Release

Post to Twitter

The current update release of VisionX 2.3.235 is available for our customers or as trial.
It's a smaller update release with some nice features:

  • VisionX listener

    It's now possible to get events of VisionX in you custom AddOns or Modules.

  • Guides

    VisionX got Guides (Read more...). The feature is still in a test phase.

  • Synonyms pointing to a view

    The Data Edit wizard supports synonyms pointing to a view. But be careful, because automatic metadata detection is limited in that case.

  • Lib update

    All libs (JVx, ProjX, VaadinApps, ...) were updated to their latest versions.

The rest are fixes for smaller bugs (most are only relevant for developers):

  • Support for BooleanDataType
  • Help creation works if you didn't set a group label
  • Designer view doesn't toggle the width while dragging
  • Better variable naming for DBStorage types

Have fun with VisionX 2.3.235.

EPlug 1.2.4 is available

Post to Twitter

Our Eclipse plugin for JVx and VisionX is available as version 1.2.4.
It's a small bugfix release.

Changes

  • Proxy support (tests)

    Some customers had problems with http(s) proxies and our trial activation. We made extended tests with (win/linux) proxies and didn't find any problems. We reduced the communication timeout because it was too long. Please send us your feedback.

  • Additional checks for client/server code mixing

    It might be a problem if you use a server class (src.server) in your client classes (src.client). This depends on the deployment mode (Web, Desktop, ...), but it's better to separate client and server code. The new check can be dis/enabled but it checks by default if your client has direct server references.

  • Using Metadata independent of AbstractCachedStorage

    It's now possible to use column name autocompletion, even if the storage isn't an instance of "AbstractCachedStorage".

Simply update EPlug via Eclipse or jump to the info page.

Using Oracle JET with VisionX/JVx

Post to Twitter

The shiny new technology from Oracle is JET (Javascript Extension Toolkit). It's a really interesting thing because it bundles relevant technologies like jQuery, jQuery UI, Knockout, Require, Hammer, ...

You don't need know-how for every used technology, only JET is enough. This is a nice and new approach in the JS world. A possible problem with such an approach could be the update of single libraries, but this isn't your problem because Oracle has to maintain the right versions and bugfixes in JET. So it's not our problem :)

I'm not a big fan of Javascript libraries/technologies but from time to time I like to play around with such things and proof the interaction with JVx. Some time ago my new friend was AngularJS.

This time, I tried to work with Oracle JET.

The use-case was trivial: I'd like to visualize a list of contacts as simple table. The contacts are available as REST service. The REST service needs basic authentication.

Foreword: JET has much documentation and some useful examples, but it's inconsistent because the documentation shows different solutions for the same problem and you don't know which is best or recommended. And the examples are sometimes too complex. The start with existing examples is simple but if you start coding, it's not so simple. But this is a documentation problem and has nothing to do with the product itself. I prefer source code to find out how things work and this procedure worked without problems for JET.

Foreword 2: I couldn't find a description for Basic authentication. Not in the forum, not in the documentation and not in different blog posts. But I found many questions regarding Basic authentication. I found a solution for the problem but if someone has a better solution, please add a comment. My solution is more or less not API compliant - but works with JET version 1.1.2 and hopefully with newer versions as well.

Conditions

I've used our VisionX tool and the Contacts demo application for this example because VisionX has an embedded tomcat and REST access is pre-configured. It's not tricky to use any other simple JVx application but it requires more work because you need an application server and a deployed application.

The Trial version of VisionX is a good start. Before I show you the source code, I'll show you the result:

Contacts table

Contacts table

You're right, this isn't rocket science. But it's not hard to add more columns and some css.

What about the source code?

We have one html page, index.html:

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html>
  <head>
    <title>JET with VisionX/JVx</title>
   
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">
    <link rel="icon" href="css/images/favicon.ico" type="image/x-icon" />

    <link rel="stylesheet" href="css/libs/oj/v1.1.2/alta/oj-alta-min.css" type="text/css"/>
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="css/demo-alta-patterns-min.css"/>
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="css/override.css" type="text/css"/>

    <script data-main="js/main" src="js/libs/require/require.js"></script>
  </head>
 
  <body>
    <br/>
    <div id="mainContent" class="oj-md-12 oj-col page-padding">
      <div class="demo-page-content-area page-padding">  
        <h1>Contacts via VisionX</h1>
        <br/>
        <table id="table"
          data-bind="ojComponent: {component: 'ojTable',
                                   data: dataSource,
                                   columns: [{headerText: '#',
                                              field: 'ID', sortable: 'enabled'},
                                             {headerText: 'First name',
                                              field: 'FIRSTNAME', sortable: 'enabled'},
                                             {headerText: 'Last name',
                                              field: 'LASTNAME'}]}">

        </table>
      </div>
    </div>    
  </body>
</html>

We need two javascript files, main.js:

requirejs.config({
    paths: {
        'knockout': 'libs/knockout/knockout-3.3.0',
        'jquery': 'libs/jquery/jquery-2.1.3.min',
        'jqueryui-amd': 'libs/jquery/jqueryui-amd-1.11.4.min',
        'promise': 'libs/es6-promise/promise-1.0.0.min',
        'hammerjs': 'libs/hammer/hammer-2.0.4.min',
        'ojdnd': 'libs/dnd-polyfill/dnd-polyfill-1.0.0.min',
        'ojs': 'libs/oj/v1.1.2/min',
        'ojL10n': 'libs/oj/v1.1.2/ojL10n',
        'ojtranslations': 'libs/oj/v1.1.2/resources',
        'signals': 'libs/js-signals/signals.min',
        'text': 'libs/require/text'
    },
    shim: {
        'jquery': {
            exports: ['jQuery', '$']
        },
        'crossroads': {
            deps: ['signals'],
            exports: 'crossroads'
        }
    },
    config: {
        ojL10n: {
            merge: {
                //'ojtranslations/nls/ojtranslations': 'resources/nls/menu'
            }
        }
    }
});

require(['ojs/ojcore',
         'knockout',
         'jquery',
         'app',
         'ojs/ojknockout',
         'ojs/ojknockout-model',
         'ojs/ojdialog',
         'ojs/ojinputtext',
         'ojs/ojinputnumber',
         'ojs/ojbutton',
         'ojs/ojtable',
         'ojs/ojdatacollection-common'],
        function(oj, ko, $, app)
        {
            var vm = new app.contactsVM();
         
            $(document).ready(function()
            {
                ko.applyBindings(vm, document.getElementById('mainContent'));

                //Show the content div after the REST call is completed.
                $('#mainContent').show();
            });
        });

and app.js

define(['ojs/ojcore', 'knockout', 'ojs/ojmodel'],
       function(oj, ko)
       {
           function viewModel()
           {
                var self = this;
                self.serviceURL =
                   'http://localhost/services/rest/vxdemo/ContactsWorkScreen/data/contacts';
                self.dataSource = ko.observable();
                self.ContactsCollection = ko.observable();
               
                self.myBasicAuth = function() {};
                self.myBasicAuth.prototype.getHeader = function ()
                {
                    var headers = {};
                    headers['Authorization'] = 'Basic ' + btoa("admin:admin");
                   
                    return headers;
                };
               
                parseContact = function(response)
                {
                    return {ID: response['ID'],
                            FIRSTNAME: response['FIRSTNAME'],
                            LASTNAME:response['LASTNAME']};
                };

                var Contact = oj.Model.extend(
                {
                    urlRoot: self.serviceURL,
                    parse: parseContact,
                    idAttribute: 'ID'
                });
   
                var myContact = new Contact();
               
                var ContactsCollection = oj.Collection.extend(
                {
                    url: self.serviceURL,
                    model: myContact,
                    oauth: new self.myBasicAuth(),
                    comparator: "ID"
                });
               
                self.ContactsCollection(new ContactsCollection());
               
                //simple Request test
                //self.ContactsCollection().fetch({headers: {"Authorization": 'Basic ' + btoa("admin:admin")}});
               
                self.dataSource(new oj.CollectionTableDataSource(self.ContactsCollection()));      
           }

           return {'contactsVM': viewModel};
        }
    );

Above files are not enough to run the example because you need a full JET application. You can download a JET application from the official site (-> Getting started with Oracle JET -> Downloading Oracle JET). The QuickStart template works well. Unzip the application into the directory: <VisionX_folder>/rad/apps/visionx/WebContent/ojet (ojet must be created manually). Simply copy the example files in the ojet, ojet/js folder.
Open the browser and navigate to: http://localhost/ojet/

My source code is small and simple but I don't know if it could be optimized. The official CRUD example application has more features and doesn't connect to a real REST service.
It wasn't funny to use/read the example because it's much for such a simple use-case. I found a similar but inofficial example. This was nice but didn't solve the Basic authentication problem!

Long story, short:

I found no option for Basic authentication and no documentation, but found that OAuth is supported. Not the same as Basic authentication but something I could search in the source code. The Model file was the right place to search (-> oauth).

And my simple solution for Basic authentication was:

self.myBasicAuth = function() {};
self.myBasicAuth.prototype.getHeader = function ()
{
  var headers = {};
  headers['Authorization'] = 'Basic ' + btoa("admin:admin");
                   
  return headers;
};

Username and password are hardcoded, but it's easy to replace the code with a better solution.

The "authenticator" will be set as oauth property:

var ContactsCollection = oj.Collection.extend(
{
    url: self.serviceURL,
    model: myContact,
    oauth: new self.myBasicAuth(),
    comparator: "ID"
});

The problem with this API is that it's not guaranteed that the getHeader method will be used in future releases. And it's also not perfect to use oauth for Basic authentication, but whatever.

Our example runs with VisionX' embedded tomcat. If you want to test with your own application server, you should enable CORS for VisionX to use the REST services from an external server:

To enable CORS, change the web.xml in <VisionX_folder>/conf/ and add

<init-param>
  <param-name>cors.origin</param-name>
  <param-value>http://localhost:8080</param-value>
</init-param>

to RestletServlet definition.

Example Download

Use OBridge together with JVx

Post to Twitter

OBridge is a nice Java FOSS project. The description according to the website:

OBridge generates standard Java source code for calling PL/SQL stored procedures and functions.

It's focus is on Oracle but this wasn't a limitation for us to test it with JVx.

Most of you know that JVx has generic support for procedure/function calls which is DB independent. The implementation is not really type-safe but it's simple.
If type-safety is preferred, you could use OBridge for your application.

I write about this library, because it's super small and simple. We love small and simple things :)

Assume, we have following PL/Sql procedure:

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE execProcedure(pNumber IN OUT NUMBER,
                                          pInText IN VARCHAR2,
                                          pOutText OUT VARCHAR2) IS
  nr NUMBER := pNumber;
BEGIN
  pOutText := 'Out: '|| pOutText ||' In: '|| pInText;

  pNumber := pNumber + pNumber;
END execProcedure;

and function:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION execFunction(pNumber IN OUT NUMBER,
                                        pInText IN VARCHAR2,
                                        pOutText OUT VARCHAR2) RETURN VARCHAR2 IS
  res VARCHAR2(200);
  nr NUMBER := pNumber;
BEGIN
  pOutText := 'Out: '|| pOutText ||' In: '|| pInText;

  pNumber := pNumber + pNumber;

  RETURN 'IN-Param Nr: '|| nr;
END execFunction;

 

With JVx, the procedure and function call will look like following JUnit test:

@Test
public void testCall() throws Exception
{
    DBAccess dba = DBAccess.getDBAccess("jdbc:oracle:thin:@localhost:xe", "test", "test");
    dba.open();
   
    /**
     * Procedure call.
     */

    OutParam ouTextParam = new OutParam(InOutParam.SQLTYPE_VARCHAR);
    dba.executeProcedure("execProcedure", BigDecimal.valueOf(25),
                         "Hello JVx' procedure", ouTextParam);

    Assert.assertEquals("Out:  In: Hello JVx' procedure", ouTextParam.getValue());

    /**
     * Function call.
     */

   
    ouTextParam = new OutParam(InOutParam.SQLTYPE_VARCHAR);
    Object oResult = dba.executeFunction("execFunction", Types.VARCHAR,
                                         BigDecimal.valueOf(25),
                                         "Hello JVx' function", ouTextParam);
   
    Assert.assertEquals("IN-Param Nr: 25", oResult);
    Assert.assertEquals("Out:  In: Hello JVx' function", ouTextParam.getValue());
}

 

and the same with OBridge:

@Test
public void testCall() throws Exception
{
    DBAccess dba = DBAccess.getDBAccess("jdbc:oracle:thin:@localhost:1521:xe", "test", "test");
    dba.open();
   
    /**
     * Procedure call.
     */

    Execprocedure proc = ProceduresAndFunctions.execprocedure(BigDecimal.valueOf(35),
                                           "Hello OBridge procedure", dba.getConnection());
   
    Assert.assertEquals("Out:  In: Hello OBridge procedure", proc.getPouttext());

    /**
     * Function call.
     */

   
    Execfunction func = ProceduresAndFunctions.execfunction(BigDecimal.valueOf(35),
                                            "Hello OBridge function", dba.getConnection());
   
    Assert.assertEquals("IN-Param Nr: 35", func.getFunctionReturn());
    Assert.assertEquals("Out:  In: Hello OBridge function", func.getPouttext());
}

 

The OBridge code saves two LoC for the call, but it needs some additional classes and packages in your application. If you change your procedure or function definition in the database, you have to recreate the Java files.
This is not needed with pure JVx, but it's your choice.

The code generation is not tricky, simply follow the official documentation. Our steps:

  • Create the file config.xml in the working directory of your project
    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

    <configuration>
        <jdbcUrl>jdbc:oracle:thin:test/test@localhost:1521:xe</jdbcUrl>
        <sourceRoot>./src/</sourceRoot>
        <rootPackageName>com.sibvisions.apps.obridge.db</rootPackageName>
        <packages>
            <entityObjects>objects</entityObjects>
            <converterObjects>converters</converterObjects>
            <procedureContextObjects>context</procedureContextObjects>
            <packageObjects>packages</packageObjects>
        </packages>
    </configuration>

  • Run the main class: org.obridge.OBridge with argument: -c config.xml
    (or use -c fullqualified_path_to_config.xml)
 

If you love our generic built-in solution, you don't need OBridge but if you prefer type-safety it's definitely an option.