Posts tagged: JVx

Jasperreports integration

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Jasperreports is a wonderful Reporting library/product. It's OpenSource and great for commercial products. There are several products like JasperReports Server and Jaspersoft Studio. Especially the Jaspersoft Studio is very useful for creating reports with a WYSIWYG editor. Simply use the tool and create your reports.

The most insteresting part is the integration of Jasperreports in a JVx application. It's super easy to start Jasperreports programmatically:

//database connection
DBAccess dba = DBAccess.getDBAccess("jdbc:hsqldb:hsql://localhost/personsdb", "sa", "");
dba.open();

HashMap<String, Object> hmpParams = new HashMap<String, Object>();
hmpParams.put("ID" , Integer.valueOf(1));
//external connection as parameter
hmpParams.put("REPORT_CONNECTION", dba.getConnection()); // String

// compile report
JasperReport jasperReport = JasperCompileManager.compileReport(ResourceUtil.getResourceAsStream("Leaf_Grey.jrxml"));
 
// fill report (connection as parameter)
JasperPrint jasperPrint = JasperFillManager.fillReport(jasperReport, hmpParams);
// fill report (hardcoded connection)
//JasperPrint jasperPrint = JasperFillManager.fillReport(jasperReport, hmpParams, dba.getConnection());
 
File fiPdf = File.createTempFile("report", ".pdf");

// export report to PDF
JasperExportManager.exportReportToPdfFile(jasperPrint, fiPdf.getAbsolutePath());

// JVx usage
RemoteFileHandle rfh = new RemoteFileHandle(fiPdf);

// open with PDF viewer
//FileViewer.open(fiPdf);

Our example was created with Jasperreports 6.3.1. The library has some dependencies:

  • Apache Commons Logging
  • Apache Commons Digester 2
  • Apache Commons Collections
  • Apache Commons BeanUtils
  • iText 2.1.7 (unpatched) or iText 2.1.7.js5 (jaspersoft patched)

A complete Eclipse example project can be found here. It connects to a HSQLDB with following tables:

CREATE CACHED TABLE POSTLEITZAHLEN
(
 ID INTEGER IDENTITY,
 PLZ VARCHAR(5) NOT NULL,
 ORT VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL,
 CONSTRAINT UK_POST_PLZ_ORT UNIQUE(PLZ, ORT)
)

CREATE CACHED TABLE STRASSEN
(
 ID INTEGER IDENTITY,
 NAME VARCHAR(200) NOT NULL,
 CONSTRAINT UK_STRA_NAME UNIQUE(NAME)
)

CREATE CACHED TABLE ADRESSEN
(
 ID INTEGER IDENTITY,
 POST_ID INTEGER NOT NULL,
 STRA_ID INTEGER NOT NULL,
 HAUSNUMMER INTEGER NOT NULL,
 STIEGE INTEGER,
 TUERNUMMER INTEGER,
 CONSTRAINT FK_ADRE_POST_ID FOREIGN KEY (POST_ID) REFERENCES POSTLEITZAHLEN (ID),
 CONSTRAINT FK_ADRE_STRA_ID FOREIGN KEY (STRA_ID) REFERENCES STRASSEN (ID)
)

CREATE CACHED TABLE ANREDEN
(
 ID INTEGER IDENTITY,
 BEZEICHNUNG VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL,
 CONSTRAINT UK_ANRE_BEZEICHNUNG UNIQUE(BEZEICHNUNG)
)

CREATE CACHED TABLE TITEL
(
 ID INTEGER IDENTITY,
 BEZEICHNUNG VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL,
 CONSTRAINT UK_TITE_BEZEICHNUNG UNIQUE(BEZEICHNUNG)
)

CREATE CACHED TABLE PERSONEN
(
 ID INTEGER IDENTITY,
 PERS_ID INTEGER,
 ANRE_ID INTEGER NOT NULL,
 TITE_ID INTEGER,
 ADRE_ID INTEGER,
 VORNAME VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL,
 NACHNAME VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL,
 GEBDAT DATE NOT NULL,
 CONSTRAINT FK_PERS_ANRE_ID FOREIGN KEY (ANRE_ID) REFERENCES ANREDEN (ID),
 CONSTRAINT FK_PERS_TITE_ID FOREIGN KEY (TITE_ID) REFERENCES TITEL (ID),
 CONSTRAINT FK_PERS_PERS_ID FOREIGN KEY (PERS_ID) REFERENCES PERSONEN (ID),
 CONSTRAINT FK_PERS_ADRE_ID FOREIGN KEY (ADRE_ID) REFERENCES ADRESSEN (ID)
)

The final step for the integration into a JVx application is the integration in a life-cycle object, e.g.

public IFileHandle createReport() throws Exception
{
    JasperReport jasperReport = JasperCompileManager.compileReport(
                                   ResourceUtil.getResourceAsStream("person.jrxml"));
     
    JasperPrint jasperPrint = JasperFillManager.fillReport(jasperReport,
                                                           null,
                                                           getDBAccess().getConnection());
     
    File fiPdf = File.createTempFile("report", ".pdf");
   
    // export report to PDF
    JasperExportManager.exportReportToPdfFile(jasperPrint, fiPdf.getAbsolutePath());
   
    return new RemoteFileHandle(fiPdf);
}

JVx 2.6 is available

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We're happy to announce that JVx 2.6 is available.

What's new?

  • Configuration via ServiceLoader

    It's now possible to use the ServiceLoader to configure an application (IApplicationSetup). It's enough to add a library to the classpath. It's not needed to extend anything.

  • Save bounds

    The Swing launcher now restores last frame bounds. The size and position of your application will be automatically saved and restored after an application restart. This feature takes care of multi monitor environments.

  • Better XmlNode API
    public XmlNode get(int pIndex)
    public XmlNode getFirstTextNode() // Getting the root node in xml file
    public void addAll(Collection<XmlNode> pNodes)
    public void insertAll(int pIndex, Collection<XmlNode> pNodes)
    public void setNodes(List<XmlNode> pNodes) // replaces setSubNodes
    public List<XmlNode> getNodes() // gets sub nodes never null and readonly
    public List<XmlNode> getNodes(short pType) // Gets sub nodes of given type
    public XmlNode remove(int pIndex)
  • Session states

    It's now possible to detect whether a session is initializing or destroying/expiring.

  • Message class improvements

    Simple support for Yes, No, Cancel messages.

  • preAuthentication support

    It's now possible to configure your sessions before authenticating without custom security managers.

  • BFILE and lazy loading

    New support for BFILE database columns and improved lazy loading mechanism.

  • Many Bugfixes

The full changelog is available here.

JVx Reference, of Technologies and Factories

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Let's talk about the UI layer, the implementations and the factory that powers it all.

The basics

For everyone who does not know, JVx allows you to write code once and run it on different GUI frameworks, without changing your code. This is achieved by hiding the concrete GUI implementations behind our own classes, the UI classes, and providing "bindings" for different GUI frameworks behind the scenes. Such a "Single Sourcing" approach has many advantages, and just one of them is that migrating to a new GUI framework requires only the change of a single line, the one which controls which factory is created.

The Factory Pattern

The Factory Pattern is an important pattern in Object-Oriented-Programming, it empowers us to delegate the creation of Objects to another Object which must not be known at design and/or compile time. That allows us to use Objects which have not been created by us but merely "provided" to us by an, for us unknown, implementation.

Like an onion

JVx is separated into different layers, with the UI layer being at the top and of the most concern to users.

JVx Layers

Technology

Obviously, the first one in the chain is the so called "technology" layer. It represents the UI technology, for example Swing, JavaFX or Vaadin, which is used to power the JVx application.

To put it into a more simple term:

public class JButton {}

Extension

Next comes the extension layer, components from the technology are extended to support needed features of JVx. This includes creating bindings for the databook, additional style options and changing of behavior if necessary. From time to time this also includes creating components from scratch if the provided ones do not meet the needs or there simply are none with the required functionality. For the most part, we do our best that these layers can be used without JVx, meaning that they represent a solitary extension to the technology. A very good example is our JavaFX implementation, which compiles into two separate jars, the first being the complete JVx/JavaFX stack, the second being stand-alone JavaFX extensions which can be used in any application and without JVx.

Theoretically one can skip this layer and directly jump to the Implementation layer, but so far it has proven necessary (for cleanliness of the code and object structure and sanity reasons) to create a separate extension layer.

public class JExtendedButton extends JButton {}

Implementation

After that comes the implementation layer. The extended components are extended to implement JVx interfaces. This is some sort of "glue" layer, it binds the technology or extended components against the interfaces which are provided by JVx.

public class SwingButton implements IButton {}

UI

Last but for sure not least is the UI layer, which wraps the implementations. It is completely Implementation independent, that means that one can swap out the stack underneath:

JVx Layers

This is achieved because the UI layer is not extending the Implementation layer, but wrapping instances provided by the factory. It is oblivious to what Technology is actually underneath it.

public class UIButton implements IButton {}

SwingButton resource = SwingFactory.createButton()

Why is the UI layer necessary?

It isn't, not at all. The Implementations could be used directly without any problems, but having yet another layer has two key benefits:

  1. It allows easier usage.
  2. It allows to add Technology independent features.

By wrapping it one more time we gain a lot of freedom which we would not have otherwise, when it comes to features as when it comes to coding. The user does not need to call the factory directly and instead just needs to create a new object:

IButton button = new UIButton();

Internally, of course, the Factory is called and an implementation instance is created, but that is an implementation detail. If we would use the implementation layer directly, our code would either need to know about the implementations, which doesn't follow the Single-Sourcing principle:

IButton button = new SwingButton();

It also would be possible to directly use the factory (but this isn't modern coding style):

IButton button = UIFactoryManager.getFactory().createButton();

Both can be avoided by using another layer which does the factory calls for us:

public class UIButton implements IButton
{
    private IButton resource;

    public UIButton()
    {
        resource = UIFactoryManager.getFactory().createButton();
    }

    public void someInterfaceMethod()
    {
        resource.someInterfaceMethod();
    }
}

Additionally this layer allows us to implement features which can be technology independent, our naming scheme, which we created during stress testing of an Vaadin application, is a very good example of that. The names of the components are derived in the UI layer without any knowledge of the underlying Technology or Implementation.

Also it does provide us (and everyone else of course) with a layer which allows to rapidly and easily build compound components out of already existing ones, like this:

public class LabeledButton extends UIPanel
{
    private IButton button = null;
    private ILabel label = null;
   
    public LabeledButton ()
    {
        super();

        initializeUI();
    }

    private void initializeUI()
    {
        button = new UIButton();
        label = new UILabel();
       
        setLayout(new UIBorderLayout());
        add(label, UIBorderLayout.LEFT);
        add(button, UIBorderLayout.CENTER);
    }
}

Of course that is not even close to sophisticated, or a good example for that matter. But it shows that one can build new components out of already existing ones without having to deal with the Technology or Implementation at all, creating truly cross-technology controls.

The Factory

The heart piece of the UI layer is the Factory, which is creating the Implemented classes. It's a rather simple system, a Singleton which is set at the beginning to the Technology specific factory which can be retrieved later:

// At the start of the application.
UIFactoryManager.setFactoryInstance(new SwingFactory());
// Or alternately:
UIFactory.getFactoryInstance(SwingFactory.class());

// Later inside the UI wrappers.
IButton button = UIFactory.getFactory().createButton();

The complexity of the implementation of the factory is technology dependent, but for the most part it is devoid of any logic:

public class SwingFactory implements IFactory
{
    @Override
    public IButton createButton()
    {
        SwingButton button = new SwingButton();
        button.setFactory(this);

        return button;
    }
}

It "just returns new objects" from the implementation layer. That's about it when it comes to the factory, it is as simple as that.

Piecing it together

With all this in mind, we know now that JVx has swappable implementations underneath its UI layer for each technology it utilizes:

JVx Layers

Changing between them can be as easy as setting a different factory. I say "can", because that is only true for Swing, JavaFX and similar technologies, Vaadin, obviously, requires some more setup work. I mean, theoretically one could embed a complete application server and launch it when the factory for Vaadin is created, allowing the application to be basically stand-alone and be started as easily as a Swing application. That is possible.

What else?

That is how JVx works in regards to the UI layer. It depends on "technology specific stacks" which can be swapped out and implemented for pretty much every GUI framework out there. We currently provide support for Swing, JavaFX and Vaadin, but we also had implementations for GWT and Qt. Additionally we do support a "headless" implementation which allows to use lightweight objects which might be serialized and send over the wire without much effort.

Adding a new Technology

Adding support for a new Technology is as straightforward as one can imagine, simply creating the Extensions/Implementations layers and implementing the factory for that Technology. Giving a complete manual would be out for scope for this post, but the most simple approach to adding a new stack to JVx is to start with stubbing out the IFactory and implementing IWindow. Once that one window shows up, it's just implementing one interface after another in a quite straightforward manner. And in the end, your application can switch to yet another GUI framework without the need to change your code.

JVx Reference, Events

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Let's talk about events and event handling in JVx.

What are events...

Events are an important mechanism no matter to what programming language or framework you turn to. It allows us to react on certain actions and "defer" actions until something triggered them. Such triggers can be anything, like a certain condition is hit in another thread, the user clicked a button or another action has finally finished. Long story short, you get notified that something happened, and that you can now do something.

...and why do I need to handle them?

Well, you can't skip events, they are a cornerstone of JVx. Theoretically, you could use JVx without using any of its events, but you would not only miss out on a lot of functionality but also be unable to do anything useful. But don't worry, understanding the event system is easy, using it even easier.

Terminology

For JVx the following terminology applies: An event is a property of an object, you can register listeners on that event which will get invoked if the event is dispatched (fired). Every event consists of the EventHandler class which allows to register, remove and manage the listeners and also dispatches the events, meaning invoking the listeners and notifying them that the event occurred. There is no single underlying listener interface.

Within the JVx framework, every event-property of an object does start with the prefix "event" to make it easily searchable and identifiable. But enough dry talk, let's get started.

Attaching listeners as class

The easiest way to get notified of events is to attach a class (which is implementing the listener interface) to an event as listener, like this:

public class MainFrame extends UIFrame
{
    public MainFrame()
    {
        super();
       
        UIButton button = new UIButton("Click me!");
        button.eventAction().addListener(new ActionListener());
       
        setLayout(new UIBorderLayout());
        add(button, UIBorderLayout.CENTER);
    }
}

private static final class ActionListener implements IActionListener
{
    public void action(UIActionEvent pActionEvent) throws Throwable
    {
        System.out.println("Button clicked!");
    }
}

Attaching listeners as inlined class

Of course we can inline this listener class:

public class MainFrame extends UIFrame
{
    public MainFrame()
    {
        super();
       
        UIButton button = new UIButton("Click me!");
        button.eventAction().addListener(new IActionListener()
        {
            public void action(UIActionEvent pActionEvent) throws Throwable
            {
                System.out.println("Button clicked!");
            }
        });
       
        setLayout(new UIBorderLayout());
        add(button, UIBorderLayout.CENTER);
    }
}

Attaching listeners JVx style

So far, so normal. But in JVx we have support to attach listeners based on reflection, like this:

public class MainFrame extends UIFrame
{
    public MainFrame()
    {
        super();
       
        UIButton button = new UIButton("Click me!");
        button.eventAction().addListener(this, "doButtonClick");
       
        setLayout(new UIBorderLayout());
        add(button, UIBorderLayout.CENTER);
    }
   
    public void doButtonClick(UIActionEvent pActionEvent) throws Throwable
    {
        System.out.println("Button clicked");
    }
}

What is happening here is that, internally, a listener is created which references the given object and the named method. This allows to easily add and remove listeners from events and keeping the classes clean by allowing to have all related event listeners in one place and without additional class definitions.

Attaching listeners as lambdas

Yet there is more, we can of course attach lambdas to the events as listeners, too:

public class MainFrame extends UIFrame
{
    public MainFrame()
    {
        super();
       
        UIButton button = new UIButton("Click me!");
        button.eventAction().addListener((pActionEvent) -> System.out.println("Button clicked"));
       
        setLayout(new UIBorderLayout());
        add(button, UIBorderLayout.CENTER);
    }
}

Attaching listeners as method references

And last but not least, thanks to the new capabilities of Java 1.8, we can also use method references:

public class MainFrame extends UIFrame
{
    public MainFrame()
    {
        super();
       
        UIButton button = new UIButton("Click me!");
        button.eventAction().addListener(this::doButtonClick);
       
        setLayout(new UIBorderLayout());
        add(button, UIBorderLayout.CENTER);
    }
   
    private void doButtonClick(UIActionEvent pActionEvent) throws Throwable
    {
        System.out.println("Button clicked");
    }
}

Parameters or no parameters? To throw or not to throw?

By default we actually support two different classes of listeners, the specified event/listener interface itself, and (javax.rad.util.)IRunnable. Which means that you can also attach methods which do not have any parameters, like this:

public class MainFrame extends UIFrame
{
    public MainFrame()
    {
        super();
       
        UIButton button = new UIButton("Click me!");
        button.eventAction().addListener(this::doButtonClickNoParameters);
        button.eventAction().addListener(this::doButtonClickWithParameters);
       
        setLayout(new UIBorderLayout());
        add(button, UIBorderLayout.CENTER);
    }
   
    private void doButtonClickNoParameters() throws Throwable
    {
        System.out.println("Button clicked");
    }

    private void doButtonClickWithParameters(UIActionEvent pActionEvent) throws Throwable
    {
        System.out.println("Button clicked");
    }
}

Additionally, all listeners and IRunnable itself do support to throw Throwable, which is then handled inside the EventHandler. So you are very flexible when it comes to what methods you can attach and use as listeners.

Creating your own events

You can, of course, create your own EventHandlers and listeners to create your own events. All you need are two classes, an extension of EventHandler and a listener interface.

public class CustomEvent extends EventHandler
{
    public CustomEvent()
    {
        super(ICustomListener.class);
    }
}

public interface ICustomListener
{
    public void somethingHappened(String pName);
}

And that's it, from here on you can use it:

CustomEvent event = new CustomEvent();
event.addListener((pName) -> System.out.println(pName + " 1"));
event.addListener((pName) -> System.out.println(pName + " 2"));
event.addListener((pName) -> System.out.println(pName + " 3"));

event.dispatchEvent("Adam");

More methods!

You can also use an interface for listeners which has multiple methods, specifying in the constructor which method to invoke:

public class CustomEvent extends EventHandler
{
    public CustomEvent()
    {
        super(ICustomListener.class, "somethingOtherHappened");
    }
}

public interface ICustomListener
{
    public void somethingHappened(String pName);
    public void somethingOtherHappened(String pName, BigDecimal pValue);
    public void nothingHappened();
}

Now every time the event is dispatched, the somethingOtherHappened method will be invoked. Anyway, don't use this. The upside of having a "simple" listener interface with just one method (SAM-type) is that it allows to use lambdas with it. A listener interface with multiple methods won't allow this.

In JVx we reduced our listener interfaces to just one method (in a backward compatible way) to make sure all events can be used with lambdas.

Fire away!

That's it for this short reference sheet, that is how our event system can and should be used. Of course, there is much more to it under the hood, for example listeners being wrapped in proxy classes, reflection used for invoking methods and some more stuff. If you feel adventurous, be my guest and have a good look at the internals of EventHandler, it is quite an interesting read.

Mavenized everything

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We're happy to announce that all our projects are available as Maven artifacts.
Not all of our projects are public and aren't available in public Maven repositories, but we offer our own nexus for all this projects.

Which projects aren't public?

  • Vaadin Charts UI
  • Vaadin responsive application frame
  • Application client
  • Application server
  • Application Services
  • JavaFX mobile UI
  • Oracle Forms extension

We provide snapshot and release artifacts. All other - public - projects are available via maven central as release or snapshot artifacts.

  • JVx
  • JVx EE
  • Vaadin UI
  • JavaFX UI
  • Headless UI
  • Online help
  • JVx mobile

Our private Maven repository is available on a subscription basis. This doesn't mean that our private projects aren't open source projects, but we don't offer snapshot or release artifacts for them!

Maven central: JVx.web snapshots

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Our JVx headless UI (aka JVx.web) implementation is available as maven snapshot:

<dependency>  
  <groupId>com.sibvisions.web</groupId>    
  <artifactId>headless</artifactId>  
  <version>1.2-SNAPSHOT</version>
</dependency>

Don't forget the snapshot repository:

<repository>  
  <id>sonatype-nexus-snapshots</id>    
  <name>Sonatype Snapshots</name>  
  <url>https://oss.sonatype.org/content/repositories/snapshots/</url>
</repository>

Maven central: JVx.mobile snapshots

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Our JVx mobile project is available as maven snapshot:

<dependency>  
  <groupId>com.sibvisions.mobile</groupId>    
  <artifactId>mobile-server</artifactId>  
  <version>1.0.1-SNAPSHOT</version>
</dependency>

and only the API

<dependency>  
  <groupId>com.sibvisions.mobile</groupId>    
  <artifactId>mobile-api</artifactId>  
  <version>1.0.1-SNAPSHOT</version>
</dependency>

Don't forget the snapshot repository:

<repository>  
  <id>sonatype-nexus-snapshots</id>    
  <name>Sonatype Snapshots</name>  
  <url>https://oss.sonatype.org/content/repositories/snapshots/</url>
</repository>

Maven central: JavaFX UI snapshots

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Our JavaFX UI for JVx is available as maven snapshot:

<dependency>  
  <groupId>com.sibvisions.jvx</groupId>    
  <artifactId>jvxfx</artifactId>  
  <version>1.2-SNAPSHOT</version>
</dependency>

or only JavaFX extensions

<dependency>  
  <groupId>com.sibvisions.jvx</groupId>    
  <artifactId>jfxtensions</artifactId>  
  <version>1.2-SNAPSHOT</version>
</dependency>

and don't forget the snapshot repository:

<repository>  
  <id>sonatype-nexus-snapshots</id>    
  <name>Sonatype Snapshots</name>  
  <url>https://oss.sonatype.org/content/repositories/snapshots/</url>
</repository>

JVx 2.5.1 is available

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We're happy to announce that JVx 2.5.1 is available.

What's new?

  • Push-light

    Our push support has nothing to do with Websockets. It's a technology independent solution for JVx. The Push-light mechanism is available on server-side and enables you to send objects from the server to the client. If you use a direct connection betwenn client and server, the objects wil be sent immediate (e.g. vaadin UI). If you use a serialized connection, the objects will be sent with next client call or alive check.

    The API is simple:

    SessionContext.publishCallBackResult("MESSAGE", "Please logout!");

    or, in a Thread

    final ICallBackBroker broker = SessionContext.getCurrentInstance().getCallBackBroker();

    Thread th = new Thread(new Runnable()
    {
        public void run()
        {
            try
            {
                int i = 0;

                while (isMessageLoopEnabled(i))
                {
                    Thread.sleep(200);
                   
                    broker.publish("MESSAGE", getMessage(i++));
                }
            }
            catch (InterruptedException ie)
            {
                //done
            }
        }
    });
    th.start();

    It's also possible to publish to all clients, via ICallBackBroker.

    The client code is short and simple:

    connection.addCallBackResultListener(new ICallBackResultListener()
    {
        public void callBackResult(CallBackResultEvent pEvent)
        {
            if ("MESSAGE".equals(pEvent.getInstruction()))
            {
                showMessage((String)pEvent.getObject());
            }
        }
    });

    More details: Tickets #25, #1635

  • H2 DB support

    We support H2 with a custom H2DBAccess. The auto detection works with URLs: jdbc:h2:.

  • SQLite DB support

    We support SQLite with a custom SQLiteDBAccess. The auto detection works with URLs: jdbc:sqlite:.

  • MySql limit support

    Read more...

  • Life-cylcle object method inheritance
  • Pie control
  • Set individual cells of a table readonly
  • Connection retries

    We try to re-send requests, if errors occur during transmission. This feature will be available for serialized connections only.

  • Security improvements

    see Tickets: #1605, #1606, #630.

  • Session validator

    We introduced ISessionValidator interface. It allows you to cancel the session after successful authentication. You don't need a custom security manager for this!
    Simply configure the validator in your config.xml:

    <lifecycle>
      <mastersession postAuthClass="com.sibvisions.apps.server.MySessionValidator">
    com.sibvisions.apps.demo.MySession
      </mastersession>
    </lifecycle>
  • API changes

    ICellFormat got a Style attribute and the createCellFormat of IFactory got one more parameter.

The full changelog is available here.

JVx 2.5 - summer release

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The next JVx release will be version 2.5. It will be available by the end of this week (beginning of July). It's a really cool release because JVx got awesome new features. We had to change the API a little bit but it shouldn't be a problem for your existing applications.

What will be interesting?

  • Push-light

    Our push support has nothing to do with Websockets. It's a technology independent solution for JVx. The Push-light mechanism is available on server-side and enables you to send objects from the server to the client. If you use a direct connection betwenn client and server, the objects wil be sent immediate (e.g. vaadin UI). If you use a serialized connection, the objects will be sent with next client call or alive check.

    The API is simple:

    SessionContext.publishCallBackResult("MESSAGE", "Please logout!");

    or, in a Thread

    final ICallBackBroker broker = SessionContext.getCurrentInstance().getCallBackBroker();

    Thread th = new Thread(new Runnable()
    {
        public void run()
        {
            try
            {
                int i = 0;

                while (isMessageLoopEnabled(i))
                {
                    Thread.sleep(200);
                   
                    broker.publish("MESSAGE", getMessage(i++));
                }
            }
            catch (InterruptedException ie)
            {
                //done
            }
        }
    });
    th.start();

    It's also possible to publish to all clients, via ICallBackBroker.

    The client code is short and simple:

    connection.addCallBackResultListener(new ICallBackResultListener()
    {
        public void callBackResult(CallBackResultEvent pEvent)
        {
            if ("MESSAGE".equals(pEvent.getInstruction()))
            {
                showMessage((String)pEvent.getObject());
            }
        }
    });

    More details: Tickets #25, #1635

  • H2 DB support

    We support H2 with a custom H2DBAccess. The auto detection works with URLs: jdbc:h2:.

  • SQLite DB support

    We support SQLite with a custom SQLiteDBAccess. The auto detection works with URLs: jdbc:sqlite:.

  • MySql limit support

    Read more...

  • Life-cylcle object method inheritance
  • Pie control
  • Set individual cells of a table readonly
  • Connection retries

    We try to re-send requests, if errors occur during transmission. This feature will be available for serialized connections only.

  • Security improvements

    see Tickets: #1605, #1606, #630.

  • API changes

    ICellFormat got a Style attribute and the createCellFormat of IFactory got one more parameter